World Suicide Prevention Day – WSPD 2020

World Suicide Prevention day is an annual awareness day that takes place every 10th September. This annual awareness day is aimed to get everyone around the world to speak up and talk about suicide to show people that recovery IS possible.

Organisations, charities and communities all take World Suicide Prevention Day seriously and take advantage of the day to rally together to help spread awareness of how we can help create a world where fewer people die from suicide.

Every year World Suicide Prevention Day hold a different theme and point of focus in the hopes of drawing more people to their cause and to help bring light to a specific aspect of suicide. What ever the theme is that year, the goal is always still the same, to provide worldwide commitment and action to prevent suicide.

World Suicide Prevention Day (WSPD) is hosted by International Association For Suicide Prevention (or for short – IASP) who are dedicated to:

Preventing Suicidal Behaviour

Alleviating its effects

Providing a forum for academics, mental health professionals, crisis workers, volunteers and suicide survivors

Founded by the late Professor Erwin Ringel and Dr. Norman Farberow in 1960, IASP now includes professionals and volunteers from more than fifty different countries. IASP is a Non-Governmental Organisation covered with suicide prevention.

If you would like to learn more about International Association For Suicide Prevention or find out how you can help why not check out their website: IASP

So why is it so important to speak out about suicide?


– Well, just in 2018, it was recorded that in the UK and Republic of Ireland, more than 6,800 people died of suicide.

sAmaritans-suicide-stats-report

In the Uk, men are 3x more likely to die by suicide than women are and that stems from a number of things but the biggest one is the lack of normalising our emotions, especially for our men. Little boys are taught to be tough from a really young age, they are taught that cry makes you weak, that speaking out about your emotions and what’s floating around inside your head as something only girls do.

Men have been made to feel as though they don’t get to experience emotions, they aren’t allowed to let them show. But that’s a load of poppycock. You aren’t made any less of man just because you have shown people that you too are human and experience emotions, worries and troubles just like everyone else.

There is still massive amounts of terrible stigma surrounded men, surrounding people with mental health and those who are suicidal, that World Suicide Prevention Day hopes to help over come.

It’s Okay Not To Be Okay

It’s okay to speak up and out

It’s okay to struggle

It’s okay to feel lost, helpless, alone, sad, angry

and it’s okay to tell someone about how you feel

As long as you fight back, as long as you speak up, as long as you don’t let those emotions and thoughts overwhelm you into a situation that can never been reverse, can never be undone.

According to Samaritans Suicide Stats Report from December 2019:

There were 6,859 suicides in the UK and Republic of Ireland.
• 6,507 suicides were registered in the UK and 352
occurred in the Republic of Ireland.
• The suicide rate in Northern Ireland is the highest in the UK –
where men aged 25-29 have the highest suicide rate.
• The highest suicide rate in the UK, and England, is among men aged 45-49.
• The highest suicide rate in Wales is among men aged 40-44.
• The highest suicide rate in the Republic of Ireland is among men aged 55-64.
• The highest rate in Scotland is among men aged 35-44.
• There has been a significant increase in suicide in
the UK, the first time since 2013 – this appears to be
driven by an increase in the male suicide rate.
• In the UK, suicide rates among young people have been
increasing in recent years. The suicide rate for young
females is now at its highest rate on record.
• In the UK men remain three times more likely to take their own lives
than women, and in the Republic of Ireland four times more likely.
• Suicide has continued to fall in both males and
females in the Republic of Ireland.

If you want to find out more about the suicide stats report then head over to the Samaritans Website: Samaritans.org or click her to head directly to their stats report simply CLICK HERE.

If you or anyone you know is struggling right now then please reach out to someone, a friend, an internet friend, a family member, even a stranger. If you feel comfortable enough you can feel free to reach out to me, all conversations with me are private and confidential. I can offer advice, a listening ear and friendship.

Every life we lose to suicide is a tragedy, one we all have hopes in preventing.

Or you can check out these incredible websites that dedicate their time and resources to helping those who need it:

Samaritans

or Call 116 123
Email jo@samaritans.org

CALM

Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) – for men
Call 0800 58 58 58 – 5pm to midnight every day
Visit the webchat page

Papyrus

Papyrus – for people under 35
Call 0800 068 41 41 – Monday to Friday 9am to 10pm, weekends and bank holidays 2pm to 10pm
Text 07860 039967
Email pat@papyrus-uk.org

ChildLine

Childline – for children and young people under 19
Call 0800 1111 – the number will not show up on your phone bill

Contact your local GP.

or you can call 111 out of hours – they will help you find the support and help you need

Just know you aren’t alone, you aren’t the only one who has had these feelings and there are people out there who would be devastated and broken should anything happen to you. Even when it doesn’t feel like anyone cares, life is complicated and we get caught up in the moments and that means sometimes we let things and people slide. We have to remind ourselves that that doesn’t me we aren’t cared for, that they only want our time and attention when it suits them but simply that life has directed them away and then back to you again.

Everyone has a time and place in your life, if you are finding yourself lonely then perhaps that’s life’s way of trying to direct you into looking after yourself, paying attention to yourself, start a new journey that only you can take or learning to accept and love yourself. There is a different perspective to every single situation the challenging part is trying to change our own perspectives to get a more positive out look.

World Mental Health Day – Suicide Prevention 2019

Today is ‘World Mental health Day’, a day where everyone from across the world has the opportunity to help raise awareness of mental health issues and advocate against all the social injustice and stigma that surrounds those who battle with mental health issues.

This day provides us all with the opportunity to join in and add to the wider conversation that is occurring on social media, television, Podcasts and elsewhere.

This is a great time to highlight the incredible work you or others have been doing in the hopes of helping to address the stigmas that surround mental health sufferers.

“Not all wounds are visible.”

This year for 2019 World Mental Health Day, a lot of people will be focusing on Suicide Prevention in the hopes of raising awareness for those suffering with suicidal thoughts, those who have already attempted suicide and those who have been affected by those who have committed suicide.

“But I do know that I spent a long time existing, and now, I intend to live.”

By Robyn Schneider

Suicide isn’t a widely talked about topic, it can be a very taboo subject to bring up as no one wants to talk about or be reminded of death. Which is understandable, however, ignoring it and not talking about it isn’t going to help those who need help, it won’t help you should you ever find yourself in such a situation and it won’t help anyone in the future. It won’t stop people from believing that is their only way out, that is the only way to fix what they believe can’t be fixed.

I wrote a post called ‘Depression and Suicidal thoughts’ where I open up a little about my long battle with depression and talk a little about suicidal thoughts. On 10th September was ‘World Suicide Prevention Day’, a post I wrote on suicide and where I opened up a little more about suicide and try to help join others in the fight to raise awareness.

“I’m not lazy. I’m just exhausted from fighting my way through every single day.”

BY: Mimi Love

Every year close to around 800,000 people globally take their own life and there are many, many more people out there who attempt suicide or have suicidal thoughts. Every suicide is a tragedy that affects everyone from families and friends, to the communities that they came from/have joined and has a terrible long-lasting affects on those people left behind.

It is the leading cause of death among young people aged 20-34 years in the UK and it is also the second leading cause of death among 15-29 year-old’s globally.

Today I would like everyone to take a little time out of their busy lives to check in on an old friend/family member/colleague.

Take a little time to research a little about suicide and ways you, yourself can help prevent it or help someone who is thinking about it.

“It’s so common, it could be anyone. The trouble is, nobody wants to talk about it. And that makes everything worse.”

By: Ruby Wax

A total of 6,507 suicides were registered by coroners in the UK – 11.2 per 100,000 people – in 2018, up 11.8% on the previous year, according to the Office for National Statistics. Concerns were raised after an increase in the rates of young people aged from 10 – 24 years old, killing themselves, with the overall rate for that age group reaching a 19 year high and the rate for young females reaching an all-time high.

It is more now than ever crucial for us all to step up and help raise awareness for Suicide Prevention while we can still make an impact and help. We all need a better understanding and more steps need to be put into place to help prevent another person from feeling as though their life means that little that they can snuff it out and rid themselves of this world without another thought, without consequence and without leaving a few people lost and broken.

A message Of Hope

I have had a lot of people around me commit suicide, some have failed…other’s succeeded in their plans. And being surrounded by so much darkness has only made me more determined to help shed a little light wherever I can.

As powerless as suicide likes to make us feel we ALL have the power to help someone, we all have the power to change someone’s bad day and make it a little better and more than anything we have the power to learn, to change and to help.